annycrane:

INTRODUCING TAC MAGAZINE!

Hey everyone! I am so so so over the moon about this endeavor we have been working on at the Textile Arts Center for the past few months …TAC Magazine! I am bursting at the seams because I have never been more proud of anything like this before; this is something I saw as a possibility back in September, and thanks to the team at TAC…we have made it into a reality! 

Pre Sale Subscriptions are happening now! 

Please help spread the word so we can make this amazing print publication happen!! 

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Check out our BLOG for more information, as well as our Indiegogo.

Any questions/requests for more information on wholesale or advertising can be sent to mag@textileartscenter.com or to me at anny@textileartscenter.com!

Super Important! Textile Arts Center is starting TAC Magazine and it looks amazing! Please please please let’s make this happen!

jmketeenfanclub:

Kustaa Saksi. Hypnopompic. Comtemporary wool.

Arachne’s Web.

Arbor Vitae.

Herbarium of Dreams.

:O ahh

(via kivafree)

fiberistanora:

In a last-minute attempt to drum up some students for my (about to be canceled!) Screen Printed Fabric Wallpaper class at Lillstreet Art Center… Here’s one of the most compelling arguments I can make for why fabric wall paper is THE BEST EVER.

LOOOK at how SATISFYING it is to PEEEEEL off the wall! And it left the wall completely undamaged! Perfect for renters or transitional spaces!

Don’t YOU want to learn to print your own fabric wallpaper?! Sign up by Sunday!!!

certaincircuits:

ART
Kjersti Faret—“The Execution of Lady Jane Grey”
Depicts the young head of Lady Jane Grey, the Nine Day Queen, after she was executed and the quote from her executioner as he displayed her head. 
Kjersti Faret is currently a junior at SVA studying illustration. Her favorite mediums include etching, embroidery, gouache and ink. She is half Norwegian and half cat, both of which influence her work greatly.

certaincircuits:

ART

Kjersti Faret—“The Execution of Lady Jane Grey”

Depicts the young head of Lady Jane Grey, the Nine Day Queen, after she was executed and the quote from her executioner as he displayed her head. 

Kjersti Faret is currently a junior at SVA studying illustration. Her favorite mediums include etching, embroidery, gouache and ink. She is half Norwegian and half cat, both of which influence her work greatly.

(via amsel-flieg)

thespecialedition:

This is the stage my quilt and chair project is at. I am really happy with the result, particularly because I have never quilted or upholstered before. All I need to work through is some questions regarding installation. I’m thinking of placing it on a plinth to bring it closer to the viewers eye level and removing the interactive element of the work.

(via fiberistanora)

models-on-the-runway:

proenza schouler f/w 2013

models-on-the-runway:

proenza schouler f/w 2013

(via archivenewyork)

misterracoon:

myradish:

5centsapound:

Nadia Myre, Indian Act

Indian Act speaks of the realities of colonization - the effects of contact, and its often-broken and untranslated contracts. The piece consists of all 56 pages of the Canadian Federal Government’s Indian Act mounted on stroud cloth and sewn over with red and white glass beads. Each word is replaced with white beads sewn into the document; the red beads replace the negative space.

Did I mention I met her? Yeah, I met her, she’s really nice.

She did this project with hundreds of native people, women mostly.

It took years.

powerful.

(via tarot-clow)

elliesigh:

"Using my own hand as a base material, I considered it a canvas upon which I stitched into the top layer of skin using thread to create the appearance of an incredibly work worn hand. By using the technique of embroidery, traditionally employed to represent femininity and applying it to the expression of it’s opposite, I hope to challenge the pre-conceived notion that ‘women’s work’ is light and easy. Aiming to represent the effects of hard work arising from employment in low paid ancillary jobs such as cleaning, caring, and catering, all traditionally considered to be ‘women’s work’"

Eliza Bennett

A woman’s work is never done

2011

Flesh, thread

http://elizabennett.co.uk/

(via littleprincessteacup)

A girl with a serious hard on for textiles.

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